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Hoven's carp

Leptobarbus hoevenii

Leptobarbus hoevenii (Hoven's carp)
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Distribution
no distribution map available
least concern



Habitat
Temperature:
F23.0-26.0 °C
Salinity:
Ffresh water
Photoperiod:
F11-14 h
Substrate:
no data found yet
Trophic level:
not investigated by us yet
Growth
Length:
not investigated by us yet
Weight:
not investigated by us yet
Maturity:
no data found yet
Malformations:
Finsufficient data
Morphology:
not investigated by us yet
Swimming
Home range:
no data found yet
Depth:
F3.0 m
Speed:
not investigated by us yet
Migration:
Fpotamodromous
Type:
not investigated by us yet
Reproduction
Nest building:
no data found yet
Courtship:
no data found yet
Mating type:
no data found yet
Fecundity:
not investigated by us yet
Brood care:
no data found yet
Social behaviour
Aggregation:
Fschool, shoal
Organisation:
not investigated by us yet
Aggression:
Fdepends
Handling
Farming frequency:
11,642 t/year 2018
Farming stress:
no data found yet
Slaughter protocol:
Fprepared

Farming remarks

Leptobarbus hoevenii
Li0  ❘  Po0  ❘  Ce0

Leptobarbus hoevenii is a tropical freshwater carp that is native to Asia waters. It is a BENTHOPELAGIC fish that can be found in lakes, rivers, streams and floodplains of Malaysia, Indonesia, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Thailand. The populations of this carp have decreased over the years probably due to increasing human activities, such as construction of dams, deforestation, use of fertilisers and pesticides for farming, and mass exploitation of this fish. Its flesh is rich in protein, vitamin B, and minerals, but probably because of eating parenchyma and seeds of the chaulmoogra tree (Hydnocarpus) falling into the streams, this carp is reported to become intoxicated, so that eating its flesh can cause nausea in humans. Despite that, L. hoevenii has a high commercial value among the cyprinids that have been successfully bred for farming, being an important species for aquaculture in several Southeast Asian countries. Cambodians and Vietnamese praise this fish highly. Moreover, this carp has already been introduced into several countries, as Taiwan and China, both for aquaculture and as an ornamental species. However, important wild and farm information about this carp is still missing in the literature, like home range and substrate use in natural conditions and more specific data about wild aggregation patterns as well as aggression, stress response, and malformation rates under farming conditions. Therefore, further research is needed to better evaluate and improve the welfare of L. hoevenii.

For details see: WelfareCheck | farm
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